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07
17
2018

Comparing Coaching Philosophies

Our methods for teaching hitting and pitching differ from most. While there are many different styles of coaching, even those who have seen or worked with such variety find that our methods stand out in a number of ways. We’ve previously discussed various reasons for why we use weighted balls and wr...

07
24
2015

Lower Half Pitching Mechanics: Data-Driven Analysis

While it is the subject of most articles on “pitching mechanics”, the role of the lower half when it comes to the pitching delivery is open to interpretation by many coaches out there, which often serves to confuse the individual athlete. We’ve recently started a long-range analyti...

06
18
2015

Can Forearm Pronation Prevent Tommy John Surgery?

If you spend enough time in the world of baseball pitching, you will probably hear from someone that actively pronating the forearm is imperative to protecting the pitching elbow. A reason often given is that pronating the forearm engages the pronator teres muscle. Can it prevent Tommy John surgery?...

05
27
2015

Explaining the Elbow Spiral in the Pitching Delivery

Hayden Grove conducted a great interview with Trevor Bauer of the Cleveland Indians discussing pitching mechanics at a very in-depth level, including linear distraction, torso stacking and the elbow spiral for pitchers. I have to give Hayden some props; most beat writers wouldn’t dare to try t...

12
15
2014

Sequencing the 95 MPH Delivery

In Hacking the Kinetic Chain, we’ve developed a system that has evolved over six years of research and development and took over two years to fully write. Unlike other products, we do not shy away from the reality that all other “gurus” ignore – developing elite-level velocit...

08
16
2013

Disconnected Pitching Mechanics – A Good Thing?

With the proliferation of tools like the our PlyoCare balls (a daily training tool for us) and the writings of Paul Nyman’s PCR methods (Posture-Connection-Rotation), it’s also been widely accepted that a disconnected delivery is a bad thing–and the rise of “Connection Balls...